Joanne Bone

Partner

Biography

Joanne advises businesses across all sectors on intellectual property (IP) and IT issues both nationally and internationally. She provides specialist advice in relation to IT contracts, e-commerce and data protection. In IP, Joanne advises on branding strategy and getting a return on investment through licensing IPR.

She also advises on copy clearance in respect of advertisements.

Recent highlights:

  • Advising Callcredit Information Group, innovators in the application of consumer information and one of the three large UK credit reference agencies, on its contractual documentation from master service arrangements to consumer terms and branding including in relation to its market changing new product, Noddle.
  • Advising a leading UK hotel brand on its IT contracts including agreements relating to guest Wi-Fi and connectivity of its head office.
  • Advising Team 17 Software Limited, the games developer of the well known Worms game on a worldwide branding strategy.
  • Acting for Magnomatics Limited, a spin out company from The University of Sheffield which has developed revolutionary contactless, lubricant-free magnetic transmissions and ultra high-torque electrical machines in relation to exploitation agreements and IP ownership.
  • Acting for a global supplier of knowledge based software and databases for use in metabolism, toxicology and related sciences. We have drafted both standard form documentation and advised on international licence arrangements.

Market view:

Sources say she is "very good and responsive, and always gets back to us quickly. She doesn't sit on the fence – she points us in the right direction." - Chambers & Partners 2015


Read My Comments On The Latest News

  • 04/04/2017
    UK Firms Abandon GDPR Preparations As Government Triggers Brexit

    The Government has already indicated they will stick to the reforms after Britain leaves the EU. The clock is ticking and these figures are highly concerning as businesses who think that Brexit will mean the new rules don’t apply to them are mistaken. Clients have told us their worries about the amount of work that becoming GDPR compliant will involve and we’ve told them that starting early is key. GDPR compliance is a marathon and not a sprint and dealing with it sooner rather than later will mean that businesses can put in place a more manageable timetable. We have also highlighted the benefits that compliance can offer. It is hard to think of a business today that does not use personal data. Whether you have employee data, customer data or supplier data – if the data relates to an individual you will be caught by the new data protection laws. Even data relating to sole traders and partnerships will be caught. Taking a proactive approach to preparing for GDPR compliance will potentially reap benefits. Good data governance can build customer trust. The right permissions can also help you take advantage of Big Data and make your data work for your business.

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  • 03/04/2017
    MPs’ Staff Names And Salaries Wrongly Posted Online

    As the law currently stands organisations which suffer data breaches do not legally have to notify those affected. It is often good practice to do so but notification is not currently compulsory. Under GDPR if there is a data breach, which gives rise to a high risk for the rights and freedoms of individuals, it will be compulsory to notify to the Information Commissioners Office (ICO) and the individuals affected within 72 hours. In view of the short timescale, one thing that all businesses need post GDPR is a detailed contingency plan as to what they will do in the event of any data breach. If the GDPR was in force now and IPSA was found not to be complaint, there is also the potential for a fine. At the moment the fine in the UK is limited to £500k but post GDPR could be €20m or 4% of global turnover. Finally there is the possibility for a damages claim if loss suffered as a result. Under the Data Protection Act you used to (until recently following a court decision) have to show financial loss before you could recover for distress. Under GDPR you can recover any loss without showing you have been affected financially. This is a prime example of the importance of becoming GDPR compliant by the deadline of 25th May 2018. Many organisations are aware of the importance of the new regulations but unfortunately they are not doing enough about it. All organisations will have different responsibilities when it comes to the new rules and it’s important to recognise that not only is there the stick of having to comply with the rules, there is also a carrot. Taking a proactive approach towards GDPR compliance will potentially offer the benefits of building a trustworthy reputation and potentially enable you to use data to the advantage of your business – helping you save and make money in the long term.

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  • 29/03/2017
    Firms Urged To Prepare For GDPR Reform Despite Brexit

    In a recent survey of our clients they ranked data protection and GDPR compliance as top of their list of concerns ahead of Brexit, yet a worryingly small amount of firms seem to be preparing to comply. Businesses who think that Brexit will mean the new rules don’t apply to them are mistaken as the Government has already indicated they will stick to the reforms after Britain leaves the EU. It is hard to think of a business today that does not use personal data. Whether you have employee data, customer data or supplier data – if the data relates to an individual you will be caught by the new data protection laws. Even data relating to sole traders and partnerships will be caught. The GDPR requires businesses to carry out a root and branch review of how they collect and use personal data. Failure to comply can lead to fines of up to €20m or 4% of global turnover whichever is the greater. Doing nothing is not an option and the sooner you start the better. May 2018 may sound a long way off but the scale of the reforms means that you need to deal with the issues sooner rather than later. That said, taking a proactive approach to preparing for GDPR compliance will potentially reap benefits. Good data governance can build customer trust. The right permissions can also help you take advantage of Big Data and enable you to commercialise your data.

    Continue Reading
  • 21/03/2017
    Italy's DPA Issues Record Data Protection Fine

    “This case is a good indication of the direction that Data Protection Authorities are moving and should serve as a warning to all businesses. Currently in the UK, the Information Commissioner can impose fines of up to £500,000 for data breaches. This however will all change when the GDPR comes into force which introduces hefty fines for non-compliance of up to €20 million or 4% of annual worldwide turnover, whichever is bigger.”

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