Middlesbrough Charity Increasing Understanding With Brain Injury Film

Law Firm Irwin Mitchell Supporting Short Animated Film

04.05.2016

Oliver Wicks, Press Officer | 0114 274 4649

Middlesbrough charity MATRIX Neurological is launching a short animated film called ‘Me and My Brain Injury’ to help explain the impact of a brain injury to a child or young person, so that they can understand what has happened inside their head.

Thanks to support from law firm Irwin Mitchell the DVD will be provided free to families who are trying to deal with what is often a significant life changing experience.
  
The colourful film explains to the viewer how the brain works and how the connections within everyone’s brain are different. The complex effects of a brain injury can impact on a person in many different ways, which means that no two brain injuries are the same.

The film is aimed at young people aged 10 plus who are struggling to understand what has happened inside their head. It explains why it’s suddenly so difficult to do things compared to the way they were before the brain injury, which may be affecting the way they think, absorb information, act, physically move and communicate. All can have a massive effect on their lives, especially in school.

MATRIX Neurological is a new charity that has been set up to provide practical help and support for children, young people and their families who are living with the effects of an acquired brain injury.

National law firm Irwin Mitchell regularly works with clients from the North-East of England and is supporting the DVD after seeing first-hand how complex the process is that people must go through after suffering a serious brain injury.

John Davis, a serious injury consultant at Irwin Mitchell, believes the film will be a big help during a rehabilitation process that can often be challenging.

The innovative film has been developed with funding from the Goshen Trust and Tees Valley Community Foundation.

Jan Rock the Founder of MATRIX Neurological said: “The NHS estimates that across the UK approximately 40,000 children and young people under the age of 16 sustain a brain injury every year from a serious head injury as a result of an accident or from an illness.

“From experience and talking to Medics we know what is provided by the NHS and also what isn’t.  We aim to fill the gaps by providing pioneering support services that will make a real difference to people affected by brain injury.  Raising awareness will also improve understanding of the effects of acquired brain injury.

“We know how hard an acquired brain injury is to understand and to explain to others, which is why although the film is based on medical science, it simplifies the subject and shows what personalised help and support can be provide to help the brain to recover some of the lost skills and abilities.

“Thanks to Irwin Mitchell’s support this new animated film can be provided free to children and young people who are affected by acquired brain injury.” 
 
The film, ‘Me and My Brain Injury’ is now on general sale and all income generated will be reinvested to enable the charity to support more brain injury families. A short clip can also be viewed on their website.