Fifth Of Young People With Bowel Cancer Waited Over A Year For Diagnosis

Medical Negligence Lawyers Call For Improvements In Cancer Care For Young People

16.06.2015

A fifth of young people diagnosed with bowel cancer suffered with the disease for more than a year before being diagnosed by medical professionals.

According to a new study conducted by Bowel Cancer UK, one in five young people had to see their GP five times before they were eventually referred to a cancer specialist.

Expert medical negligence lawyers at Irwin Mitchell have called for improvements in cancer care for young people after the study indicated significant geographical variations in the standard of treatment, care and support for younger people dealing with the disease.

More than 400 sufferers of bowel cancer, which is the second most common cause of cancer death in the UK, under the age of 50 were questioned in the study. Deborah Alsina, chief executive of Bowel Cancer UK, said that younger people experience significant delays in diagnosis, due in part as they do not think bowel cancer is a possibility, and in part because neither do their doctors.

Mandy Luckman, an expert medical negligence lawyer at Irwin Mitchell, who has represented patients impacted by delays in diagnosis, said:

Expert Opinion
Swift diagnosis and treatment for bowel cancer plays a critical role in increasing the chances of sufferers surviving and recovering from the disease.

“Clearly, this research shows that young people are not being given the care and support they require when faced with symptoms related to bowel cancer. It is absolutely vital standards are improved and GPs are made aware of the symptoms of the disease and also that young people can be impacted by it.

“We would also like to see improvements related to help and support for young people dealing with a cancer diagnosis.
Mandy Luckman, Partner