Charity Issues Safety Guidelines Ahead Of Tour De France

British Horse Society Advises Riders And Cyclists To Share Roads Safely


As Yorkshire prepares for the arrival of the Tour de France, the British Horse Society has issued guidelines for cyclists and horse riders to keep safe on the roads.

The charity’s Senior Executive for Safety, Sheila Hardy, has released advice for riders ahead of the weekend which will see the race leave Leeds and travel through Harrogate, York and Sheffield.

Cyclists are advised to: Let horse riders know you’re there as the horse will probably not see or hear you, especially if you are approaching from behind.

Slow down and pass wide on the right, giving plenty of room.

Pass in small groups of four or five as large groups of cyclists can be very scary for horses.

To horse riders the advice is: Check the many road closures and make alternative arrangements if necessary to get access to your horse.

Wear reflective and fluorescent clothing at all times to make sure you are seen.

Keep your eyes and ears, and watch your horse’s ears – he may often hear a cyclist before you do.

Ms Hardy, who both horse rides and cycles, said: “Recognising the time, financial and emotional investment made by both horse riders and cyclists goes a long way to helping us all stay safe on the road.

“There is room for everyone. It just needs a little care, courtesy and consideration being shown to each other.”

Expert Opinion
All road users have a duty to take care when they are passing or approaching horses being ridden or led along public roads.

“Although cyclists may not think they pose a significant risk to horses, any unpredictable movements or sudden noise can startle a horse which can be very dangerous for the rider and lead to serious injury.

“The Tour de France is likely to result in more groups of cyclists taking to the roads which is great for fitness and reducing pollution, but it is vital that all road users, including horse riders, consider the potential risks they pose and risks they may face to keep everyone safe.”
Cathryn Godfrey, Associate