Report Calls For Better Care For Dementia Patients

Care System 'Is Failing Alzheimer's Sufferers'


Andrew Robinson, Press Officer | 0113 218 6463
People suffering from dementia do not always get the care they need because the illness is still not recognised as a terminal diagnosis, a new report by Marie Curie and the Alzheimer's Society states.

The report underlines many of the issues dementia sufferers face in the later stages of their lives, when they are often in need of high-quality care that they are unable to access.

Problems with care include inconsistent quality, inadequate pain management and barriers to getting the right treatment.

"End of life care for people with dementia remains a hidden aspect of health and social care in England so it is vital that we shine a light on the final stages of dementia to improve care and support for people and their families," said Phil McCarvill, Head of Policy and Public Affairs at Marie Curie.

The number of people affected by dementia is expected to reach 850,000 by 2015, according to The Alzheimer's Society. The illness is the leading cause of death in women and the third leading cause in men.

Expert Opinion
Ensuring patients are provided with the best possible care should always be a top priority, so it is extremely concerning to hear reports that those diagnosed with dementia are not receiving the care they need.

“It is vital these findings are investigated and measures are implemented to ensure dementia sufferers are able to access the treatment those suffering from other conditions rely upon. Improving the quality of dementia care should be a top priority and it is crucial sufferers and their families are reassured that work is ongoing to improve standards across the board.

“In our work we have seen first-hand the devastating impact poor quality care can have on patients and we hope the findings of this report are taken into account and problems and failings are addressed immediately.”
Mandy Luckman, Partner