Illness outbreak on sunshine island

Illness on Holiday claim

21.11.2005

A relaxing vacation for a group of more than 60 holidaymakers staying at the Fodele Beach Hotel, on the Greek island of Crete, turned into a disaster. Within hours of their arrival the guests began to feel ill with diarrhoea and stomach cramps. Guests nicknamed the illness 'Fodele belly.'

Many of the guests, who stayed at the hotel in September 2005, reported their problems to their tour operator immediately although many have not received a response to their correspondence, which has added to their frustration.

Among the holidaymakers affected by the illness were couple, Dave Collier and Allie Nichol, from Sherborne in Dorset. Both became ill during their all-inclusive holiday. Mr Collier said: "Our holiday was completely ruined by illness and when we were not stuck in our room using the toilet we were chasing the hotel staff for additional water and answers as to what was causing the illness. At least 50 guests who had been taken ill, attended a meeting with the Med Hotels' representative but the management seemed to take no responsibility for the problems we were encountering."

Guests experienced problems with the water supply at the hotel being erratic and some guests have reported the tap water as being yellow in colour. There was also work going on with the water systems at the hotel throughout their holidays.

Holiday claim lawyers

Suki Chhokar of national law firm Irwin Mitchell says: "The hotel management seem to have been aware of the problem at the hotel but failed to warn guests and failed to ensure that health and hygiene standards were maintained to prevent guests from becoming ill.

"Unfortunately a large number of people seem to have been affected by the illness at this hotel. We have had enquiries from 60 people who stayed at the 'Fodele Beach' and we are expecting enquiries from many more who have experienced similar symptoms to our clients."

"Sadly, for many who suffer illness whilst they are abroad, the symptoms continue long after they return home. Many people go on to suffer long-term or permanent symptoms. Most cases could be avoided if hotels or tour operators reacted more quickly to guests' complaints and ensured they complied with simple health and hygiene practices relating to food production and other hotel services."

Can we help you? If you or someone you know has been involved in a similar incident then visit our accidents and illness abroad section for more information.