Cryptosporidium Detected At Birmingham Swimming Pool Where Children Fell Ill

Public Health Experts Concerned Over Long-Term Health Implications


Andrew Robinson, Press Officer | 0113 218 6463

Specialist Public Health lawyers at Irwin Mitchell have expressed concerns that children who fell ill after swimming at the Cocks Moors Woods swimming pool may face long-term health complications.


Tests conducted at the Birmingham swimming pool detected the presence of Cryptosporidium, a parasite that can cause vomiting and diarrhoea.


Reports indicated that one child who fell ill after swimming at the facility earlier this year, which is run by the Birmingham Community Leisure Trust, was hospitalised and suffered with symptoms for five weeks.


Amandeep Dhillon, a Partner and expert Public Health lawyer at Birmingham law firm Irwin Mitchell, who has represented hundreds of people affected by Cryptosporidium outbreaks in the UK and abroad, said the parasite can lead to long-term health implications for victims, particularly vulnerable people such as children.

Expert Opinion
“The discovery of Cryptosporidium at the Cocks Moors Woods pool is very concerning and we know from experience how serious the illness it causes can be for children. Clearly, at least one of the children affected has suffered longer term symptoms.

"The focus must now be on protecting the general public and it is welcome that the pool has been closed to allow the problems to be rectified.

“There needs to be a clear understanding as to why this has happened and reassurances that steps are being taken to try and prevent the same thing happening again.

“Cryptosporidium can have serious health implications for those affected and in our work we have seen first-hand the long-term issues that it can cause, from which some victims may never fully recover.”
Amandeep Dhillon, Partner

The pool closed on 23 May and is expected to reopen on 4 June. The Birmingham Community Leisure Trust said its pools are regularly tested, but Cryptosporidium is not usually tested for.