Injuries On 'The Jump' Raise Questions About Safety

Safety On The Slopes Survey Highlights The Risks Of Winter Sports


Oliver Wicks, Press Officer | 0114 274 4649

Serious injury lawyers at Irwin Mitchell have questioned safety procedures on Channel 4’s 'The Jump' after Heather Mills became the seventh celebrity to be forced to leave after suffering an injury.

Heather Mills, who had been called up to the competition as a replacement, injured her knee and thumb in training while former Girls Aloud singer Sarah Harding also had to leave after a ruptured knee ligament. 

The third series of the show has seen more than half the contestants suffer injuries with former Olympic swimmer Rebecca Adlington calling her shoulder injury “the worst thing that has ever happened to me”.

Channel 4 ordered producers to urgently look into safety procedures after there were calls for the series to be axed when Olympic gymnast Beth Tweddle suffered a serious neck injury.

Irwin Mitchell supports clients who have suffered serious injuries on the slopes and helps them receive the rehabilitation and support they need. 

The law firm is running a Safety on the Slopes campaign to remind everyone of the importance of having lessons and the correct training before they go skiing abroad.

Conducted as part of the campaign, a survey of 3,812 Brits who’ve been skiing in Europe found that nearly a quarter (23%) of skiers have suffered injuries abroad and that of the 864 who suffered injuries, 31% had to fly home and almost 30% had to spend time in hospital.

Specialist International personal injury lawyer Demetrius Danas believes the survey highlights the risks that come with taking part in winter sports. He also questions whether enough is being done to protect the celebrities taking part in the Channel 4 reality show. 

Expert Opinion
“Many of the celebrities who take part in The Jump are relative novices and when you consider the number of injuries on the show in both this and previous years you have to question whether the safety procedures in place are thorough enough to protect the contestants.

“Our survey shows the risks of participating in winter sports and the fact remains that anyone can suffer an injury when taking part in such an adrenaline-filled activity. Ultimately though, the more experienced and prepared you are, the less likely it is that you’ll suffer an injury or risk injuring a fellow skier.

“15% of skiers admitted in our survey that a lack of experience, practice or training caused their accident to happen. If this is happening on beginner slopes around the ski slopes of Europe then it can easily happen to celebrities who must attempt jumps and challenges that need extensive training to pull off.

“The number of injuries on The Jump is a matter of concern and if the makers of the programme are not able to take steps to reduce the number of casualties then it may be time to consider if the risks are too great and whether this series should be brought to an end before a contestant suffers even more serious and life changing injuries.”
Demetrius Danas, Partner

Irwin Mitchell’s interactive Safety on the Slopes website, which helps skiers prepare for their holidays on the slopes, is available here.