HSE Workplace Death Statistics Shows Increase

Provisional Figures Indicate 144 Were Killed While At Work In 2015/2016


Saffron Otter, Press Officer | 0114 276 4666

Workplace injury lawyers at national law firm Irwin Mitchell say more health and safety law enforcement is needed after figures released today show a second year increase in workplace fatalities.

Health and Safety Executive (HSE) statistics today reveal that 144 people were killed in Great Britain while at work in 2015/2016 – up from 142 in 2014/2015.

Within key industrial sectors, 43 workers died in construction, 27 deaths in agriculture - compared to a five year average of 32 - in manufacturing, there was a rise with 27 deaths compared to a five year average of 22 – but this figure includes three accidents that resulted in a total of eight deaths, and there were six fatal injuries to workers in waste and recycling compared to a five year average of seven.

Yet against the rise, the statistics also reveal that the UK is still considered one of the safest places to work in the UK.

Reacting to the statistics, Stephen Nye, national head of workplace injuries at Irwin Mitchell, who has represented families who have lost loved ones as a result of accidents at work, said:

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“To see that the figures have increased for the second year running, even if it is a slight increase, is not acceptable and any number of deaths is simply too many.

“We monitor HSE statistics to determine whether improvements have been made and while it is promising to see that the UK is considered to be one of the safest places to work in Europe, there are still some industry sectors where deaths at work are on the rise.

“We have repeatedly called for improvements to safety standards in the workplace and will continue to do so until companies stop putting the lives of employees at risk. All workers should be able to go to and from work every day without facing risk of injury or worse.

“Health and safety law needs to be a forefront priority for all employers and the government, and attention also needs to be drawn to disreputable businesses that fail to comply with their legal duty to take out employer liability insurance.”
Stephen Nye, Partner


The HSE is Britain’s national regulator for workplace health and safety.