Coroner Rules HGV Driver Died From Industrial Disease

Exposure To Asbestos Caused David Jones’ Mesothelioma


Dave Grimshaw, Press Officer | 0114 274 4397
A man who died after suffering from mesothelioma, a fatal form of lung cancer, contracted the disease following prolonged exposure to asbestos, a coroner has ruled.

David Jones, from Wotton, was a lorry driver for local builders Jotcham and Kendall between 1963 and 1980, which involved frequent trips to Fibrecrete in Chalford to load and unload asbestos sheeting, drainpipes and guttering.

The court heard that before Mr Jones’ death in April, aged 73, he confirmed that his work involved driving heavy goods vehicles for the building firm and that it was a very dusty environment. 

The symptoms of mesothelioma can take between 10 and 50 years after exposure to asbestos to appear.

Gloucester county coroner Katy Skerrett ruled that she was satisfied that exposure to asbestos was the principal reason Mr Jones contracted mesothelioma decades after he handled asbestos and that his death was due to industrial disease.

She recorded a conclusion that his death was due to industrial disease.

Expert Opinion
Many people have lost their lives to asbestos related diseases as a consequence of their association with Fibrecrete, which manufactured asbestos products and was later a subsidiary of Cape plc.

“At the time of Mr Jones employment, Fibrecrete would have been aware of the dangers, by virtue of legislation, that placed a duty on employers to safeguard their workers from the risks associated with asbestos.

“In similar cases I have worked on, no respiratory protection was provided by the company to safeguard against the dangers of inhalation of asbestos. No warnings were issued to employees and visitors to the factory site, of the dangers associated with asbestos.

“The dangers of asbestos exposure should never be underestimated and we would urge current employers to always recognise the dangers the material can pose.”
Satinder Bains, Partner