Biography

I head up the contentious team nationally and handle disputes involving trustees, beneficiaries and executors. I deal with all types of challenges to Wills which can involve issues relating to mental capacity, undue influence and Will irregularities. I also handle claims for financial provision for spouses, cohabitees, children and maintained parties. I have particular experience handling farming dispute claims involving the doctrine of proprietary estoppel.

Testimonials

Paula is a "true specialist" - Legal 500 2016

Paula Myers "inspires a first-rate team" at Irwin Mitchell - Legal 500 2015

"She is absolutely top class – she tackles probate and estates claims with charm and incredible ability." - Legal 500 2014

Paula was also recommended on the national elite lawyers list and is described as ‘‘a serious player... who is confident and knowledgeable, and gets results". - Legal 500 2014

According to impressed sources she "has a limitless ability to carry big cases". - Chambers & Partners 2016

"She is a formidable solicitor. She is very good at explaining difficult concepts to lay clients" - Chambers & Partners 2015

“Very thorough and very diligent Paula Myers receives extensive praise for her expertise. Sources say she is very pragmatic. The advice she gives clients takes into account the commerciality of litigation”. - Chambers & Partners 2014

What Inspired You To Get Into Law?

I like the intellectual challenge of a complicated legal problem and helping clients to achieve a result.

What Is The Most Rewarding Aspect Of Your Role?

Client satisfaction.

What Do You Like About Working At Irwin Mitchell?

Our national platform, our fantastic people and the achievements and results that we deliver for our clients.

What Do You Do Away From The Office?

Spend time with friends and family and relax.

Client Testimonial

"As a trustee of a Will, representing minor beneficiaries, I engaged Paula, as a result of a recommendation, to act on my behalf in a dispute with 2 other trustees. 'Paula was able to quickly recommend a strategy to address the dispute. This gave me confidence to continue to defend the interests of the minors and it was obvious that she was an expert in this area, but also she made the risks clear and throughout the case told me what I needed to hear, not necessarily what I wanted to hear. I was extremely happy with the ultimate settlement that was achieved by the efforts of Paula and her team. It was not inexpensive but in life you get what you pay for. Paula's expertise and approach is well worth paying for and I would not hesitate to recommend her services." –Graeme Hall


Read My Comments On The Latest News

  • 26/04/2017
    Newcastle Law Firm's Serious Injury Team Successfully Recovers Over £45m For Injured Clients

    “The PI team works closely with other teams such as Court of Protection and Public Law to ensure that whilst their case is ongoing and even after legal action has concluded they are supported throughout their recovery. “The damages we recover for our clients enable them to have access to the necessary treatment and rehabilitation programmes for the rest of their lives. These people would rather they hadn’t suffered serious injuries but it’s our job to help them get the best possible outcome so that they can live as independently as possible and get the help and support they need to recover. “Our Court of Protection team has extensive specialist knowledge and resources to assist clients who lack the requisite capacity to manage their own property and affairs such as those suffering from dementia or Alzheimer’s, or brain injuries caused through medical negligence or severe head injuries in accidents or assaults.”

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  • 15/03/2017
    Charities Win Landmark Ilott v The Blue Cross and Others Will Dispute In Supreme Court

    “Each case contesting a Will is decided on its individual merit, but this Judgment could potentially make it more difficult for adult children to challenge their parent’s Wills under the Inheritance Act and it may give people executing a Will greater strength to resist any challenges. It may also give people the peace of mind for people writing a Will that their wishes will be followed, and children can still be disinherited, unless certain criteria are met by the challenging party. “The Judges did give some clarity on what is considered to be a reasonable maintenance for non-spouses and felt that in this particular case there were no grounds for overturning the original order of £50k made by the District Judge, dismissing the Court of Appeal decision to award £163k. They outlined that reasonable provision could include a life-interest for provision of housing, rather than a large capital sum. “However, as Lady Hale pointed out, there is still a need for further guidance or even legislation around the circumstances in which adult children might be able to bring a claim for a more reasonable maintenance which is currently decided on a case by case basis.”

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  • 14/03/2017
    Supreme Court To Rule On Landmark Will Dispute

    “The Court of Appeal ruling clarified that people could still disinherit their children but they would have to provide a good reason for doing so and should be able to explain what connects them to the people or organisations that they have included in their wills instead. “The ruling potentially made it easier for adult children who have been left out of wills to challenge them if they have not been left a reasonable provision and we have seen a rise in enquiries from people who feel that they have been unfairly disinherited. “However the charities appealed that ruling at the Supreme Court in December and hope to overturn the CoA judgment which could make it more difficult for adult children to challenge their parent’s wills under the Inheritance Act. “Whatever the Supreme Court decides, the judgment from this case will provide clarity to the Inheritance Act 1975 and likely set out the guidelines for when challenges can be brought to wills based on inadequate provision and set out the criteria which must be met in order to disinherit your adult children."

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  • 09/12/2016
    Supreme Court To Hear Landmark Will Dispute

    “The Court of Appeal ruling clarified that people could still disinherit their children but they would have to provide a good reason for doing so and be able to explain what connects them to the people or organisations that they have included in their wills instead. “The ruling potentially made it easier for adult children who have been left out of wills to challenge them if they have not been left a reasonable provision and we have seen a rise in enquiries from people who feel that they have been unfairly disinherited. “Now the charities are appealing that ruling at the Supreme Court and hope to overturn the judgment which could make it more difficult for adult children to challenge their parent’s wills under the Inheritance Act. “Whatever the Supreme Court decides, the judgment from this case will provide clarity to the Inheritance Act 1975 and likely set out the guidelines for when challenges can be brought to wills based on inadequate provision and set out the criteria which must be met in order to disinherit your adult children."

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