Lisa Stratford



Lisa has considerable experience of commercial property disputes and real estate litigation, with particular expertise in landlord and tenant matters.

She also specialises in leasehold enfranchisement and rights of first refusal matters for both institutional landlords and, occasionally, residential leaseholders.

Lisa has acted for major commercial, industrial, retail and property clients on disputes such as adverse possession and nuisance claims, breach of contract, guarantee liabilities and professional negligence claims.

Recent highlights:

  • Managing the property litigation matters across HSS Hire Service Group's portfolio.
  • Assisting in the management of various national retailers' property portfolios, including lease renewals and terminations, dilapidations claims, breach of covenant disputes and rent arrears.
  • Defending an application for registration following adverse possession of part of an extensive commercial site.
  • Providing strategic and technical advice on the rights of first refusal procedure for an exclusive London residential development.
  • Obtaining possession of commercial and residential properties on behalf of various clients including Banks and LPA Receivers.
  • Managing a national portfolio of industrial and office properties following acquisition a major investor.

Market view:

Lisa offers "pragmatic and easy-to-understand solutions" - ​Legal 500 2016

"(Lisa) immediately started to provide the type and quality of advice we expect." - Kurt Mather, HSS Hire Service Group.

Read My Comments On The Latest News

  • 31/03/2014
    Court Of Appeal Ruling Highlights Tenant At Will Issue

    The landlord in this case took a fairly unusual position in this instance by arguing that a periodic tenancy had arisen. Often when a former tenant remains in occupation after the expiry of a lease, the landlord will want to prevent a periodic tenancy arising in order to avoid the tenant acquiring security of tenure and enable the landlord to regain possession of the property if a better deal can be found. "A tenancy at will is generally implied where there are negotiations for a new lease, but in this instance the landlord argued the opposite in order to secure rent payment for a longer period. "The decision should offer some comfort to those landlords who continue to accept rent after the expiry of a lease and while negotiations continue, but do not want to find themselves in a position where they cannot obtain possession of the premises. Equally, tenants should be comforted by the fact that by remaining in occupation throughout negotiations, they are not committing themselves to the premises for a longer period."

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