Chair Of Inquiry Into Child Sexual Abuse Quits

Legal Experts Say Departure Must Not Cause Survivors Further Suffering


Kate Rawlings, Press Officer | 0114 274 4238

Legal experts assisting with the inquiry into child sexual abuse say the resignation of Dame Lowell Goddard must not cause the survivors further anguish by delaying the process.

Home Secretary Amber Rudd insisted the inquiry would continue "without delay" and in the absence of a new chair.

The inquiry was set up in July 2014 to investigate allegations made against local authorities, religious organisations, the armed forces and public and private institutions in England and Wales, as well as people in the public eye.

Justice Goddard, a high court judge from New Zealand, was selected after two previous chairwomen quit.

Her resignation letter said that undertaking such a widespread inquiry was "not an easy task" but "compounding the many difficulties was its legacy of failure which has been very hard to shake off".

Some media critics described the resignation as a "crisis" for the inquiry.

Tracey Storey, a Partner at Irwin Mitchell and child abuse expert, is assisting the inquiry and advising survivors of child sexual abuse who want their voices heard, including victims of abuse from religious groups and those in the care of Lambeth council.

Expert Opinion

We are helping survivors who want their voices heard and need answers about the abuse which happened to them as children.

This Inquiry has already seen three Chairs appointed then leave their posts which has left survivors involved facing the emotional upheavals of false starts.

The departure of Dame Lowell Goddard must not hold up this Inquiry even further and add to the suffering these survivors have already experienced.

There is a lot of work to be done to bring these survivors one step closer to justice and a new Chair needs to be appointed soon to ensure that victims can trust the system and have the confidence to come forward.
Tracey Storey, Partner