RMT Union Calls For Tube Station Closure Over Asbestos Fears

Expert Asbestos-Related Disease Lawyers Reiterate Need For Asbestos Removal In Public Places

05.04.2016

The Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union has called from Ealing Broadway Tube station to be closed over fears asbestos has been disturbed.

A number of roof tiles fell onto a platform at the west London station and were investigated by Transport for London (TfL).

A TfL spokesman said: "We are aware that a small part of the roofing of Ealing Broadway station has low grade asbestos.

"However we can reassure our customers that this has been thoroughly investigated by our specialist staff and poses no danger to our customers or staff.

The Tube operator determined the tiles were made of fibreglass and did not contain asbestos, however it announced that work would be carried out to remove asbestos from the affected part of the roof.

Ian Bailey, a Partner and expert asbestos-related disease lawyer at Irwin Mitchell, which has regularly called for improvements to be made in the way asbestos in public places is monitored, managed and removed, said the incident indicates that further steps need to be taken to protect the public.

If you or a loved one has been affected by an asbestos related illness, our solicitors can help you to claim compensation. See our Asbestos Claims page for more information.

Expert Opinion
Asbestos can be a dangerous substance if it falls into a state of disrepair and is disturbed in any way. We have seen the severe and, in some cases, fatal impact inhaling asbestos dust and fibres can have.

“The material was commonly used in the construction of public buildings, like hospitals, Tube stations and schools for its fire retardant and insulating properties, but as a result of this we are now seeing a significant increase in the number of people exposed to asbestos in public buildings.

"Asbestos is highly dangerous and it is important appropriate measures are put in place so it can be continuously audited, monitored and managed in public buildings so that we can identify the asbestos that is at the highest risk of causing harm and take steps to safely remove it.
Ian Bailey, Partner