Over 2,000 Non-Food Product Alert Notifications Issued By RAPEX In 2015

Expert Product Liability Lawyers Call For More Stringent Measures To Stop Faulty Products Entering The Market

27.04.2016

Specialist product liability lawyers from Irwin Mitchell have called for more stringent product inspections after the European Commission Rapid Alert System for Non-Food Products (RAPEX) issued more than 2,000 product alerts in 2015.

In the 12 months there were 2,072 alerts and 2,745 follow-up actions registered in the system.

The organisation indicated that faults and defects with children’s toys and clothing are the most common recalls. Irwin Mitchell is currently investigating potential defects with a E-cigarettes, hoverboards and possibly faulty white goods.

Catherine Slattery, an expert product liability lawyer at Irwin Mitchell, who represents consumers who have suffered illness or injury as a result of defective products, called for urgent action to tighten regulations governing products entering the European market.

Expert Opinion
“While of course it is welcome that faulty and defective products are being identified and recalls are being sent out to ensure consumers are protected, the figures clearly indicate there are far too many problematic products entering the market.

“We have seen just how serious faulty products can be and it is particularly concerning that recalls for children’s toys are some of the most common.

“Consumers have every right to expect all products that reach the shelves to be safe for use but sadly for a significant number of products this simply isn’t the case under the current system.

“Clearly steps need to be taken to understand why so many defective products are entering the market and further measures need to be implemented to tighten inspection rules to try and prevent these items hitting the shelves in the first place.”
Catherine Slattery, Solicitor

The European Commission is currently developing improvements to the rapid alert system which will increase the focus on online sales, in a bid to reduce the number of unregulated products entering consumers’ homes directly.