IKEA Recalls Children’s Fancy Dress Bat Cape Over Safety Fears

Experts Voice Concern Following Reports Item Could Strangle Children

07.04.2016

Product liability experts at law firm Irwin Mitchell have voiced their concerns after IKEA issued a recall of a fancy dress bat cape over fears it may strangle children. 

Worried parents reported that the Lattjo bat cape caused injuries to their children, forcing the Swedish flatpack furniture giant to issue a worldwide recall of the product. 

It is believed that the Velcro fastening of the cape can become stuck and  not detach easily enough from the children’s necks if pulled, risking injuries and strangulation. 

Following the complaints, IKEA responded by urging customers around the globe to immediately stop children from playing with the cape.

IKEA is recalling the capes after reports that three children received marks and scratches to the neck while using them, the firm said in a statement.  

'The cape got stuck and didn’t detach easily enough from the children’s necks', the company added.  

'No injuries which required medical treatment have been reported, but due to the risk of strangulation or injuries to the neck, IKEA takes precautionary measures and recalls the product.'

Lattjo bat capes have been sold in all IKEA markets except Russia and Indonesia since November 2015. 

The capes can be returned to any IKEA store around the world for a full refund, proof of purchase is not required. 

This is the second global recall involving the Lattjo range this year, after reports of issues involving sets of Lattjo drum sticks and tongue drum toys. 

The products were advertised as suitable for six-year-olds, but rubber balls attached to the sticks could be taken off and posed a threat as a choking hazard.  

Our expert personal injury lawyers will provide you with free initial advice on your compensation claim if you have been injured or fallen ill as a result of faulty or defective products. See our Defective Product Claims page for more information.


Expert Opinion
We have seen the consequences, both physical and psychological, that poorly designed or defective products can cause.

The expectation of safety for children’s toys or novelty items is very high and the potential consequences of a problem like this could be catastrophic.

Ikea have acted responsibly by recalling the product but it should not have been put on sale in the first place. We urge anyone who has this product to stop using it immediately and return it to Ikea.
Tim Annett, Partner