Steel Worker's Widow Appeals For Help Following His Mesothelioma Death

Asbestos-Related Disease Specialist Investigating Lanarkshire Asbestos Exposure


Andrew Robinson, Press Officer | 0113 218 6463

The heartbroken widow of a former North Lanarkshire steel worker is appealing to his former colleagues for help after he died from mesothelioma, an incurable cancer caused by exposure to asbestos decades ago.

Henry Brodie, who was known to his friends and colleagues as Harry, died at the age of 75 in May 2015 just three months after he was diagnosed with the asbestos-related disease.

Now his widow Marion and children Neil and Alison have instructed expert asbestos-related disease lawyers at Irwin Mitchell Scotland to investigate how he was exposed to the deadly dust and fibres that led to his death.

Harry, who spent his early life in Shotts, North Lanarkshire, worked as a fitter at Lanarkshire Steel Company in Motherwell from 1954 to 1962, before emigrating to Whyalla, South Australia in 1964.

Before his death Harry told his legal team at Irwin Mitchell Scotland that his role at the Lanarkshire Steel Company including maintaining, repairing and fitting boilers and steam pipes. These were wrapped in asbestos lagging and the work he carried out would involve cutting through the lagging, which he recalled created a significant amount of dust in the atmosphere.

Harry, a grandfather-of-four, remembered using bolt cutters, hacksaws, tin snips and even his bare hands to remove the asbestos lagging from the pipes and that at the end of each day his overalls would be covered in asbestos dust and fibres.

Now his widow Marion, 72, backed by legal experts at Glasgow-based law firm Irwin Mitchell Scotland, is appealing to Harry’s former colleagues at the Lanarkshire Steel Company during the 1950s and 60s to come forward with the crucial information the family needs following Harry’s death.

Emma McBride, an expert asbestos-related disease lawyer at Irwin Mitchell Scotland representing the family, said:

Marion, who was married to Harry for 50 years, said: “We are all absolutely devastated by Harry’s death and the whole family is struggling to come to terms with our loss and the pain and suffering he went through in the final months of his life.

“We are determined to understand how and why he was exposed to asbestos during his working life. He believed it was during his time working in Motherwell for the Lanarkshire Steel Company and we would love for his former colleagues from the 50s and 60s to come forward and provide our legal team with the information they need to get justice for Harry, his children and grandchildren.”

Anyone with information on the presence of asbestos at Lanarkshire Steel Company and the safety measures in place at the plant should contact Emma McBride at Irwin Mitchell Scotland on 0141 300 4301 or email