Myles Bradbury Abuse Report: Lawyers Hope Lessons Are Learned

Concerns Raised Regarding ‘Clues’ Related To Offences Being Missed


Lawyers who specialise in helping victims of abuse to gain justice regarding their ordeals have urged that lessons must be learned from a new report into the actions of Dr Myles Bradbury, who was jailed last year for abusing children at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge.

Bradbury was sentenced to 22 years in prison in December after admitting abusing 18 boys in his care, although this was reduced to 16 years in custody and six years on licence on appeal.

A new report into the case has now been published by consultancy firm Verita for Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, which has found clues to Dr Bradbury’s offending were missed by other members of staff, with those who knew he was seeing patients out-of-hours assuming he was helping them out.

While he was also confronted by a colleague after it was noticed he was breaking a rule that a colleague should be present for some examinations, his explanation that the child was being bullied was accepted.

In reaction to the report, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust acting chief executive David Wherrett said the NHS must learn from the “deeply distressing case”.

The sentiment has been echoed by specialist lawyers in Irwin Mitchell’s abuse team, who represent those who have suffered long-lasting consequences as a result of similar ordeals.

Expert Opinion
“This is a truly shocking case and it is clear that this new report raises very important issues which now must be acted upon to improve the safeguarding of young people.

“It is particularly concerning that some policies were not followed and that, despite being confronted, Bradbury was able to continue to exploit such regulations. The NHS must learn from this and ensure that systems put in place are always closely following and adhered to.

“The extent of the impact such problems have on children cannot be underestimated, as we have seen a huge number of cases in which people have been unable to speak out or come forward for help regarding such ordeals and trauma.

“It is vital that while lessons are learned by all NHS Trusts on this issue, those known to be affected are given the support they need to hopefully take steps towards coming to terms with what they have faced and move forward with their lives.”
Tracey Storey, Partner