Popularity Of Cosmetic Surgery Declined In 2014

Figures Down 9% Compared With 2013


Andrew Robinson, Press Officer | 0113 218 6463
Cosmetic surgery's popularity declined by 9% among patients in the UK last year, according to the latest figures from the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (BAAPS).

There were 45,406 cosmetic surgery procedures in 2014, compared with 50,122 the previous year.

Breast augmentation, tummy tucks, nose jobs and ear corrections all saw year-on-year declines of 20% or more, while only face and neck lifts, breast reduction and liposuction figures rose.

Although cosmetic surgery for male patients has increased significantly in recent years, 2014 saw a 15% decrease in men's appetites for such procedures.

Rajiv Grover, a consultant plastic surgeon and spokesperson for BAAPS, said last year's decline is understandable because 2013's figures were so dramatically high, which in turn may be attributed to the "post-austerity boom".

"It might seem counterintuitive that as plastic surgeons we could possibly welcome such a change, but we are pleased that the public are now so much more thoughtful, cautious and educated in their approach to cosmetic surgery," he said.

If you have been affected by negligent cosmetic surgery you might be entitled to claim compensation. See our Cosmetic Surgery Compensation page for more information.

Expert Opinion
While the overall number of cosmetic surgery procedures dropped during 2014 a number of operations increased, with face and neck lifts, breast reduction and liposuction all rising.

“It is crucial any individuals considering cosmetic surgery thoroughly research the procedure they want to undergo, as well as the medical professionals that will be undertaking the procedure. In our work we have seen a number of instances where people have been left with physical and psychological trauma as a result of mistakes or problems during procedures.

"It is important to remember that these are surgical procedures and even in the best of hands things can and do go wrong. To ensure a patient is fully prepared for the procedure they are about to undergo they should raise any queries or concerns with their practitioner ahead of any operation.”
Mandy Luckman, Partner