More Survivors Of Sexual Assaults Coming Forward Following High-Profile Cases

Number Of Reported Rapes At Highest Level In Decades


Andrew Robinson, Press Officer | 0113 218 6463
Victims of sexual assaults are more willing than ever to come forwards and report an attack, thanks to an increase in awareness after a series of high-profile cases, official figures revealed today.

The figures measure the number of rapes and sexual assaults reported to and recorded by police, rather than estimates of the amount that occur that go unreported.

The number of rapes reported to police has grown by almost a third over the last year, reaching the highest level in more than a decade. Reporting of other sexual offences increased by 22% compared to the previous 12 months.

Instead of indicating a rise in crime, the heightened figures suggest that police standards for recording crime have improved, meaning more incidents of rape and sexual assault are being dealt with correctly. 

The increase in awareness around rape and sexual assault, and encouraging victims to come forward, has been attributed in part to a number of high-profile cases, many involving celebrities.

The Office for National Statistics said: “The renewed focus on the quality of crime recording is likely to have prompted improved compliance with national standards, leading to more crimes being recorded than previously.”

Expert Opinion
The recent high-profile cases related to abuse have put the issue in the spotlight like never before, which is seemingly giving people affected by such problems the confidence to come forward and that their voices will be heard. This is a very positive development and hopefully will mean more survivors of abuse will get the justice they deserve.

"It will have been incredibly difficult for victims to take that step many years down the line, often meaning they relive their ordeals from many years ago. This should not be forgotten as investigations continue. It is important that every effort is now made to provide the help and support survivors need and to determine what else can be done to prevent these terrible crimes from occurring in the future."
Tracey Storey, Partner