Child Road Deaths Rise For First Time In 20 Years

Over 2,000 Children Killed Or Seriously Injured On UK Roads In 12 Months


Andrew Robinson, Press Officer | 0113 218 6463
New figures published by the Department for Transport (DfT) have revealed that the number of children killed on the UK’s roads has increased for the first time in 20 years.

In the year ending September 2014, 2,060 child deaths and serious injuries were recorded, a rise of 3% on the previous year.

Casualties of all severities involving children also increased in the 12-month period, with 16,640 recorded by the DfT.

Overall, the deaths and serious injuries on UK roads increased by 4%, with 22,630 people seriously injured. Deaths increased by 1% from 1,711 to 1,730 over the 12-month period.

Transport Minister Robert Goodwill said: “Britain’s roads are still among the safest in the world and there are 40% fewer road deaths per year than a decade ago. 

“We are determined to do more to reduce these figures, working with the police and other agencies, such as promoting road awareness through our THINK! campaign.”

If you or a loved one has been involved in a road traffic accident, our No Win No Fee personal injury lawyers could help to get the compensation, rehabilitation and support you deserve. Visit our Road Traffic Accident Compensation page for more information.

Expert Opinion
The increase in the number of children killed or seriously injured on the UK’s roads is extremely concerning and indicates the work that still needs to be done on road safety. While the UK’s roads are some of the safest in the world, one death is quite frankly one too many, so it is vital further work is done to make the UK’s roads even safer.

“Measures such as 20mph zones in urban areas, where children are particularly vulnerable, a tougher stance on drink and drug driving and the introduction of a graduated driving licence for new motorists would all help contribute to improvements on the roads.

“We have seen the devastating impact road collisions can have, particularly when vulnerable road users such as children and cyclists are involved. Therefore, it is vital every possible measure to reduce road casualties is explored and, if appropriate, implemented as soon as possible.”
Sion Kingston, Partner