23k Cycling Accidents In London Over Five Years

DfT Figures Show Alarming Rate Of Cycling-Related Accidents

25.02.2015

Some 12 road accidents a day in Greater London between 2009 and 2013 involved cyclists, according to Department for Transport figures studied by insurer Aviva.

There was a total of 22,988 accidents and 80 deaths involving cyclists in the region, with the Elephant and Castle roundabout in South London flagged as the worst accident blackspot, and Trafalgar Square as second-worst.

Accompanying the figures, Aviva published details of the cycling-related claims it handled around the country in 2013. The majority (64%) of claims involved commuters, with one-third being men aged 40-49.

Vans were involved in over a third (37%) of incidents, while a similar proportion involved heavy goods vehicles.

Additionally, only 50% of women were found to have been wearing a helmet when their accident happened, compared with 70% of men. Another third of cyclists who were involved in serious accidents after dark were not using their lights.

"Cycling in London has never been more popular but the continued rise in the number of collisions involving cyclists is alarming," said Aviva Chief Underwriting Officer Simon Warsop.

"The human cost of these incidents can be immeasurable and we believe more can be done to reduce them."

If you or a loved one has suffered an injury in a cycling accident, you may be able to claim compensation. See our Road Traffic Accident Claims page for more information.


Expert Opinion
These new statistics are extremely concerning and should act as a reminder that the work done on improving road safety in recent years is not finished and we should not rest on our laurels.

“Busy, built-up areas such as London are extremely dangerous for cyclists and we regularly see the damage caused in a collision between cyclists and other road users. It is imperative new measures to protect cyclists on the roads are investigated and, if appropriate, implemented as soon as possible. The cycle safety action plan published last year by the Mayor of London and Transport for London outlined a series of measures designed to reduce the number of injuries and deaths on London’s roads.

“The reduction of the speed limit in built-up areas, new vehicle technology and the improvement of cycling infrastructure could make a significant difference to the number of injuries and fatalities on the UK’s roads and it is vital they are considered and implemented as soon as possible, as they may save lives and prevent families from losing loved ones in preventable collisions on the UK’s roads.”
Colin Ettinger, Partner