Asbestos Discovered In Buckingham Palace State Dining Room

Expert Lawyers Call For Increased Action On Asbestos In Public Buildings

01.12.2015

The state dining room at Buckingham Palace has been closed after the discovery of asbestos in the ceiling during a routine survey at the Palace.

The precautionary measure was implemented after the potentially dangerous substance was discovered. Access to the room has been suspended and a further investigation of the ceiling is set to take place.

This is the second time asbestos has been discovered in the Queen’s official residence in recent months and staff have previously revealed the Queen may have to move out of the Palace to allow renovation work to take place, including the removal of asbestos, rewiring and updating the plumbing.

Expert asbestos-related disease lawyers at Irwin Mitchell have called for this incident to lead to further action on the way asbestos in public buildings is monitored and removed and have backed an all-party group of MPs that has called for a new asbestos eradication law that would require “the safe, phased and planned removal of all the asbestos” in Britain by 2035.

If you or a loved one has been affected by an asbestos related illness, our solicitors can help you to claim compensation. See our Asbestos Claims page for more information.

Ian Bailey, a Partner and expert asbestos-related disease lawyer at Irwin Mitchell, said: 

Expert Opinion
The reports of asbestos being found at Buckingham Palace are a concern.

“This is yet another example of how common a problem asbestos can be in older buildings and this is the second time the substance has been discovered during routine surveys at the Palace. We welcome the action being taken to limit access to the room and the measures implemented to remove the potentially dangerous substance.

“However, there is still a lack of action from the Government when it comes to the removal of asbestos from other public buildings, including schools, local government premises and hospitals. It is absolutely vital the clean-up of public buildings does not stop with high-profile properties and that it is extended to ensure members of the public are protected from the hazards of asbestos where possible.

“At Irwin Mitchell we have regularly called for increased action around asbestos in public buildings, including the creation of a full risk register for public buildings throughout the UK so that the safe removal of the harmful asbestos can be carried out, and a stringent monitoring programme can be put in place.
Ian Bailey, Partner