Care Home Closures Leave Elderly Stuck In 'Care Warehouses'

Two Homes Closed For Every One Opening, With Smaller Residential Facilities Lost


Andrew Robinson, Press Officer | 0113 218 6463

Expert medical negligence lawyers with experience representing people affected by poor standards in residential care homes have expressed concern for elderly patients after new research revealed recent care home closures have seen an increasing number of older people living in ‘industrial-sized’ care homes.

A report from Healthcare Property Consultants (HPC) found that, since 2011, 204 care homes have closed each year, while only 103 have opened. However, the total number of beds has remained largely unchanged, as the focus has moved from smaller residential homes to much larger institutions.

Condemned by many charities as "factory-style" homes or "care warehouses", these larger homes are largely run by a smaller group of larger providers, many of whom have taken over smaller homes.

Charities have raised concerns about whether these larger homes can adequately meet the needs of vulnerable residents, and whether larger providers are cutting corners to keep down costs.

Neil Duncan-Jordan, from the National Pensioners Convention, said: "It is a really worrying picture. We are talking here about someone’s home, their four walls until the end of their life.

"A lot of elderly people can feel 'lost in the crowd' at these large homes, and want somewhere more intimate to live."

George McNamara, head of policy and public affairs at the Alzheimer's Society said: "It is deeply concerning at a time of increasing demand that many smaller, specialist providers often embedded in the community are being forced to close.

"Years of neglect and underfunding of the market is forcing older people to crisis point, not able to access the specific care and support they need."