Shipley Nursing Home Blasted By CQC

Numerous Failings Have Been Found At A Nursing Home In Yorkshire


The Ivy House Nursing Home in Shipley, West Yorkshire, has been told to improve by the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

Inspectors visiting the site found patients' privacy, dignity and independence were "not respected".

People were often not well looked after, and many residing at the home wore stained and torn clothing, as well as dirty slippers. A large proportion of the men had not been shaved and a number of patients had long, dirty fingernails.

When CQC monitors inspected bedrooms, they found faeces on the inside cushions of some chairs and a lack of privacy curtains in shower rooms.

One man, who had dementia and a visual impairment, complained that his beard was growing too long and he did not have access to a shaver.

Staff at Ivy House argued that a risk assessment meant he should not be able to use a trimmer, but this was not listed as a concern in his care plan and even if it was an issue, he should have been shaved by staff to maintain his dignity.

The main issue behind these problems was a lack of skilled, experienced staff to take care of residents.
In one case, two people indicated they needed the toilet in front of the inspector, but staff were unable to assist, while another person left the dining room with a cooked egg stuck to their trousers, but nobody noticed this and organised a change of clothing.

The CQC has now called for improvements to be made at the home in question as soon as possible, as this is not the first time issues have been found.

According to the authority, an unannounced inspection of Ivy House will take place in the coming weeks and months to make sure an action plan submitted by owners P&C Care is acted on.

In April 2013, enforcement action was taken against Ivy House nursing home for a lack of cleanliness and hygiene control.

Expert Opinion
The CQC findings are deeply concerning and urgent improvements must be made.

“There is no excuse for basic hygiene guidelines not to be followed, yet revelations of faeces on cushions and dirty residents suggest very poor standards in this area.

“These residents deserve to be treated with dignity and respect but it appears, due to a lack of resource, this is simply not happening.

“Given this is not the first time that the CQC has raised concerns about the home we hope that swift action will be taken by the watchdog if standards have not improved during its next visit to protect the safety of Ivy House Patients.”
Julie Lewis, Partner