North Yorkshire Care Home Blasted In CQC Report

CQC Finds Number Of Failings During Inspection


Dave Grimshaw, Press Officer | 0114 274 4397

A care home in North Yorkshire has been blasted by the CQC after a number of failings were found in an inspection.

Investigations at Pennyghael Residential Home found a number of nationally recognised standards were not met by members of staff, with cleanliness, infection control and the suitability of premises among the most problematic issues found by inspectors.

The start of the CQC report outlines that a previous investigation into the care home in October 2013 brought a number of concerns to light and that an action plan was put in place to address these issues.

But a follow-up inspection found standards were still lacking at the facility, which provides residential, personal and social care for up to 16 people with extensive care needs, including those with dementia, and is based in Selby.

People were not protected from the risk of infection because appropriate guidance had not been followed at the home.

Inspectors found insect droppings in some areas of the facility and adhesive tape was hanging from the ceiling, attracting dust and dirt - putting patients at risk of infection.

Bathrooms that were no longer in use were also inappropriately used for storage and many of those still utilised by residents were described by the CQC as being "dirty".

Equipment was also an area of concern highlighted in the CQC report, with much of it in a "poor state of repair".

"The bath hoist seat surface was peeling and scratched making effective cleaning difficult," the CQC said.

"We saw numerous damaged surfaces, making effective cleaning difficult and providing an environment to harbour micro-organisms. Surfaces should be smooth, wipe able and impervious."

Because of its repeated guideline breaches, the CQC has referred its findings to the local authorities in Selby, who will decide what action to take against Pennyghael Residential Home.

While closure is unlikely, inspectors from the local council will likely give bosses an ultimatum and demand immediate improvement.

Expert Opinion
Across the country there are care homes being inspected by the CQC which is finding failings and deficiencies in standards. In this case there are also concerns about the state of equipment and premises which are described as dirty and in a poor state of repair.

“Vulnerable people who need the care and support from residential homes deserve better and it is important for patient safety that the CQC continues to investigate and identify problems such as these – and even more important that the issues are rectified as soon as possible.”
Mandy Luckman, Partner