‘Conscious Uncoupling’ – Gwyneth Paltrow And Chris Martin Announce Separation

Couple Announces Split With Statement On Website


Dave Grimshaw, Press Officer | 0114 274 4397

Celebrity couple Gwyneth Paltrow and Chris Martin have announced that they are to separate after being married for more than 10 years.

In a joint statement the Hollywood actress and Coldplay singer said that they were to "consciously uncouple" and that while they are still close they will be separating.

The couple, who have two children, added that they are ‘parents first and foremost’.

The statement went on to say: "We have been working hard for well over a year, some of it together, some of it separated, to see what might have been possible between us, and we have come to the conclusion that while we love each other very much we will remain separate."

Expert Opinion
Many family lawyers strive to resolve family issues in a non-confrontational and constructive way, so conscious uncoupling is not a totally new concept. The idea of a ‘friendly’ divorce is an aspiration that we should all share.

"Acknowledging or accepting that a relationship has irretrievably broken down is often extremely difficult, especially when a couple has tried their best to make things work and if they have children they are responsible for. What is good to see is that people now have the option of choosing how to separate and appear to be thinking a lot more carefully about their choices.

"The mechanics of obtaining a divorce are usually quite straightforward, particularly if the couple agrees that the marriage is over. The difficulties tend to lie in resolving the related practical issues stemming from divorce, such as how to separate, where to live, the arrangements for the children and any financial matters. How those issues are dealt with will vary depending on the family involved.

"We have seen a major shift in attitude in recent years with the emergence of a variety of dispute resolution methods such as collaborative law, and more recently family arbitration. In addition, family law judges are keen for people to focus on mediation to reduce the number of contested court cases and ultimately make separating less difficult for all involved.

"If a reconciliation is not possible, then being in charge of how you separate emotionally, as well as practically and financially can be the key to remaining on good terms. This is particularly important where there are children involved – and if the two partners are likely to remain in similar social circles."
David Lister, Solicitor