NSPCC Boss Will Lead Westminster Child Abuse Review

Historical Child Abuse At Westminster To Be Investigated

07.07.2014

Dave Grimshaw, Press Officer | 0114 274 4397

Home Secretary Theresa May has announced that the head of the NSPCC will lead a review into allegations of historical child sex abuse in Westminster.

Peter Wanless who leads the children’s charity is expected to report back within 10 weeks and will address how information was dealt with by police and prosecutors while an inquiry will also be held by an independent panel of experts on law and child protection – though this is not likely to report back until after the next general election.

Mrs May also added that this could be turned into a full public inquiry if it is deemed necessary.

Her statement comes as ex-Home Secretary Leon Brittan defended his actions in dealing with a document about alleged child sex abuse given to him by the late Tory MP Geoffrey Dickens in the 1980s.

The Home Secretary is seeking to ensure the public has confidence that any potential serious crimes are being properly investigated while the Prime Minister had earlier said that an investigation into how public bodies handled abuse claims will "leave no stone unturned".

During the announcement Mrs. May said that any of Peter Wanless’s findings relating to the Director of Public Prosecutions would be reported to Attorney General Dominic Grieve as well as to the Home Secretary.

Our child abuse solicitors are committed to pursuing cases to the best possible outcome, without causing any additional  psychological trauma to those affected. Call 0370 1500 100 to talk confidentially to someone about making a claim or visit our Abuse & Criminal Injury Claims page for more information.

Expert Opinion
We welcome the review into both the allegations of abuse and the way that any information relating to these potential crimes was handled.

“It is vital that this investigation is carried out as quickly as possible to determine the extent of any problems, as well as what can be done to ensure lessons are learned from the past so that any failings are not repeated.

“If any evidence of a cover up is found, then people, no matter who they are or what position they served, need to be held accountable to send out the message that abuse simply will not be tolerated.

“Child abuse is often carried by people in positions of power and the recent high-profile abuse cases have put a spotlight on this issue like never before. Raising awareness is giving victims who have suffered physical and psychological trauma the courage to speak out on the ordeals they have endured.

“It is vital that those affected by abuse receive the help and support they need, while work continues to ensure that everything possible can be done to safeguard future generations from similar problems.”
Tracey Storey, Partner