Cruise Illness Concerns Emerge On Crown Princess And Grandeur Of The Seas

CDC Reveals Reports Of Recent Problems On Vessels

16.04.2014

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has revealed it has been notified of suspected illness outbreaks on board the Princess Cruises vessel Crown Princess and the Royal Caribbean-operated Grandeur of the Seas in the past week.

It has been revealed that more than 120 passengers on board the Crown Princess reported illness symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhoea during the cruise ship’s voyage from April 5th to 12th, with 30 crew members also thought to have been affected.

According to the CDC, one of its environmental health officers was set to board the ship upon its arrival in California at the end of the trip to conduct health assessments and evaluate the outbreak.

News of the outbreak came as the CDC also revealed it was investigating reports of 97 passengers and eight crew members falling ill on the Grandeur of the Seas across the same dates.

An environmental health officer was set to board the ship alongside an epidemiologist on its arrival in Baltimore to investigate the issues, which followed illness problems on the vessel’s previous voyage from March 28th to April 5th.

Irwin Mitchell’s specialist travel lawyers have vast experience in representing victims of cruise illness outbreaks and similar problems at holiday resorts across the world, helping them to gain answers and justice in relation to the issues they have faced.

Expert Opinion
It is a major concern to see reports of suspected outbreaks on these vessels and it is clear that a thorough investigation is needed to determine how these problems emerged, as well as whether more could have been done to prevent them.

"Cruise illness problems of this nature should not be underestimated, as we have seen numerous cases when passengers affected by such issues have gone on to develop long-term health problems as a result of what they have endured in such incidents.

"Hygiene must always be an absolute priority on board such ships to both prevent outbreaks and reduce the risk of wider infection if such problems do emerge. Any lessons that can be learned from these outbreaks will be vital in improving safety on future voyages."
Amandeep Dhillon, Partner