Family Of Former Welder Who Died From Asbestos Related Cancer Appeals For Ex Colleagues To Help Investigation

Industrial Illness Specialists At Law Firm Irwin Mitchell Working With Family in Battle for Justice

10.12.2013

The son of a former pipe welder who died of asbestos-related lung cancer is appealing for his former work colleagues to help lawyers investigate how he was exposed to the deadly dust.

Brian Tucker, of Redcar, Cleveland, was diagnosed with lung cancer in July 2012 after being admitted to James Cook Hospital for a CT scan following an appointment with his local doctor to investigate why he was suffering from pain in his chest and breathlessness.

Doctors at the hospital told Brian that the cancer was at an advanced stage and advised that he would only have up to two months to live. Despite fighting the illness for longer than predicted, Brian sadly passed away in October 2012.

Prior to his death, Brian enlisted the help of specialist industrial illness lawyers at Irwin Mitchell amidst concerns that the cancer had been caused by exposure to asbestos during his career as a welder.

Now, his son Bryan is continuing his case in his memory, to investigate where and when he was exposed to asbestos so he can obtain justice for his father.

Brian worked as a welder for over 25 years at companies across the region and before his death; he recalled regularly coming into contact with the deadly dust as he went about his work.

Working for a variety of steel plants, chemical plants and on board ships, Brian regularly came into contact with pipe work that was heavily lagged with asbestos. In order to make repairs to the pipes he would need to break into the lagging and this would cause asbestos dust to be thrown into the air which he inevitably breathed in.

Over the years he worked for:
• Teesside Bridge Construction Limited (1959 – 1961)
• Procon GB Limited (1965)
• Kellogg Limited (1965 - 1966)
• George Whimpey & Co Limited (1966 – 1967)
• Lummus Co Limited (1966 - 1967)
• Smith’s Dock of South Bank, Middlesborough (1967)
• William Press & Co Limited (1967 – 1968 and 1971 – 1972)
• R Blackett Charlton & Co Limited (1968 – 1971)
• Wilson Walton Engineering Limited (1974 – 1979)
• Berridon Engineering Services (1979 - 1980)
• Redpath Engineering Limited (1982 – 1983)
• UK Construction (1986 – 1987)

The team at Irwin Mitchell investigating Brian’s case are keen to speak to anybody who worked for the companies listed above and who might be able to confirm the presence of asbestos in the work space he would have occupied.

Brian Tucker’s son Bryan said: “My dad’s lung cancer diagnosis was heart-breaking for him and for the family as a whole and it was a bitter pill to swallow when he was given just a couple of months to live.

“My dad fought against the illness as best he could and was keen to make sure his former employers were investigated so that we could find out where and how he was exposed to asbestos.

Sadly he was not able to hold off the cancer for long enough to see the case through and now I am taking it on so that we can achieve justice in his memory and to make sure somebody takes responsibility for failing to protect him at work.”

Isobel Lovett, an expert asbestos lawyer at Irwin Mitchell’s Newcastle office, leading the case, said: “Brian’s family are devastated to have lost him in such tragic circumstances and understandably they want answers as to how this happened.

“We’re keen to speak to anybody who worked with Brian during his career as a welder as we believe they may hold vital evidence about the presence of asbestos and the working conditions he faced.”

“Companies have been well aware of the dangers of asbestos since as far back as the 1950s so there is no excuse for him not being protected from the material and nobody should suffer from such a serious illness as a result of their commitment to work and the grafting they put in for their employers.”

Anyone who thinks they may be able to help is asked to contact Isobel Lovett at Irwin Mitchell on 0191 279 0104 or email Isobel.Lovett@irwinmitchell.com.