Cambridge Study Day On Mesothelioma ‘A Great Success’

Asbestos Experts And Sufferers Discuss Impact Of Disease


Experts and victims of asbestos-related disease gathered in Cambridge this week at a hugely successful study day organised by Irwin Mitchell, where they discussed and explored the latest developments in the treatment of the devastating illnesses.

Held at the Imperial War Museum in Duxford on September 16th, the Mesothelioma and Lung Cancer Study Day offered people whose lives have been affected by the conditions a chance to talk to healthcare specialists and hear directly about research undertaken into tackling mesothelioma and asbestos-related lung cancer.

The aim of the event was to allow sufferers the opportunity to get a greater understanding of the developments being made in treating the diseases, as well as to give them a platform to discuss how they themselves have coped since diagnosis and the support they have received.

Rosemary Giles, an asbestos-related disease specialist at Irwin Mitchell who provided a presentation on legal issues at the event, said: “While we work hard to help victims of asbestos-related disease in their battles for justice, our campaigning on the issue goes above and beyond that alone.

“This event was a great success at highlighting the huge impact that asbestos-related disease has on so many lives and demonstrated the wider needs that those exposed to the deadly material have.

Split in two halves, the event began with a welcome speech from Stephen Bridge, chief executive of Papworth Hospital NHS Trust.

Following that, Dr Mark Slade, consultant respiratory physician at Papworth Hospital, chaired the morning session on mesothelioma, which included his own views on improving the diagnostic algorithm for pleural disease. Specialists including Dr David Gilligan, consultant oncologist at Addenbrookes and Papworth Hospitals, and Dr Helen Clayson of the University of Sheffield also gave presentations.

The afternoon session, chaired by Dr Robert Rintoul of Papworth Hospital then examined developments in lung cancer treatment, with experts including Dr Matt Callister from St James Hospital in Leeds discussing early lung cancer detection. Professor John Field, the director of the Roy Castle Lung Cancer Research Programme, also examined the UK Lung Cancer Screening Study.

Rosemary Giles of Irwin Mitchell added: “We hope attendees – both sufferers and healthcare professionals – were able to take a lot away from the event, including clear ideas on the latest approaches of diagnosing and treatment mesothelioma and lung cancer.

“Ultimately, we hope the result of this will be that more healthcare professionals are aware of new ways they can help those whose lives have been affected by the devastating impact of asbestos-related disease.”