Human Rights Case Research ‘Emphasises The Positives’

New Research Reveals Impact Of Legislation


The wide scope of positive work being done by legal experts through the use of the Human Rights Act has been highlighted by new research on the impact of the legislation, according to a public law specialist at Irwin Mitchell.

Figures compiled by legal information provider Sweet & Maxwell revealed that 5,107 cases on a range of issues have been heard in court since the introduction of the law in October 2000.

However the study added that the number of cases, which take in topics including tax and asylum, means that on average between one and ten issues are heard under the legislation on a daily basis.

In addition, it is thought even more cases will have taken place which may have been settled out of court.

Yogi Amin, a Partner at Irwin Mitchell who has much expertise of helping people with cases related to the Human Rights Act, said the legislation has led to some important changes that have benefited many people in society.

He explained: “The range of decisions made by courts using British human rights law is wide and the impact on British lives has been generally positive.

“For example, its influence has been felt on domestic court decisions related to health and social care, in which some of the most vulnerable people in our society can be protected by the authorities having respect for their dignity.

“In particular, elderly and disabled people have been able to assert their human rights through the courts and refer to the principles of the legislation when raising justified complaints.”