Law Firm Calls For Increased Awareness Of Deadly Meningitis Disease

Law Firm Calls For Increased Awareness Of Deadly Meningitis Disease


Medical law specialists from Irwin Mitchell solicitors are backing a national campaign to raise awareness of the deadly disease, meningitis.

The law firm is supporting National Meningitis Awareness Week, which runs from Monday 20th to 26th September and is being organised by the Meningitis Research Foundation.

Ahead of this year's awareness week, Anita Jewitt, medical law expert at Irwin Mitchell's South East office, said: "Our Medical Law team sadly handles a number of cases where meningitis has not been diagnosed or treated quickly enough, resulting in severe disability or in the most tragic of cases, the death of a patient.

"Time is of the essence, and we have found that all too often the delay results in extremely serious and devastating injuries.

"Among the many cases we handle here at Irwin Mitchell I have personally represented a child who lost both arms and both legs because of this terrible disease. This has left her needing medical care for the rest of her life, and assistance to do the simplest of day to day chores.

"The medical evidence is clear that, with early enough treatment, patients can make a full recovery.  We fully support Meningitis Awareness week and support any campaign to raise awareness that can help stop the same thing from happening again."

Evidence suggests that cases of meningitis and septicaemia tend to peak during the Autumn and Winter months so the MRF’s awareness week is a particularly important time to remind people about the devastating effects of  this disease.

"The symptoms of meningitis are not always easy to spot, although tell-tale signs - such as a rash which does not disappear when a glass is pressed against the skin (the tumbler test,) a stiff neck, temperature, lethargy and an aversion to bright lights - are all well documented.  However, a rash is not always present and so it is important to seek early medical advice if you are concerned." she added.

"It is vital that these symptoms are not forgotten or overlooked. In most cases early intervention can quite literally save a life. However, we continue to deal with families who did not receive prompt treatment, leading to catastrophic and tragic consequences."