Tinnitus Research Raises Awareness Of Excessive Noise Risks

New Research On Condition Published 

16.11.2010

A study recently published by The Journal of Neuroscience has suggested that even if your hearing hasn’t been permanently affected by loud music, the way your way brain processes sound may be changed in a way which could cause tinnitus.

Almost five million adults in Britain have tinnitus, which has been linked to severe depression and even suicide.

As party season approaches it is important that people are aware of the dangers of exposure to loud music and excessive noise.

Louise Scott, a solicitor at Irwin Mitchell’s Birmingham office who specialises in providing legal advice and support for people with noise induced hearing loss, said: “I meet many people who have worked in excessive noise and developed hearing loss and tinnitus as a result. These conditions can have a huge impact on their quality of life and I would urge people to be aware of the dangers of noise.

“My clients were exposed to dangerous levels of noise at work and our cases highlight serious failings from which important lessons can be learned to prevent the same mistakes being made in the future.”

People who can link hearing problems back to a workplace should seek advice from a specialist solicitor.

If you or a loved one has suffered from hearing damage such as acoustic shock, tinnitus, and noise-induced hearing loss caused by conditions at work our solicitors could help you claim compensation. See our Industrial Disease Claims page for more information.